Best Electric Cars And EVs 2024

Find your next electric car

Best electric cars and EVs 2024

  • We list the best EVs to buy in 2024
  • Find your next electric car
  • Plus: Electric cars explained

Electric cars are set to take another major leap forward in 2024. Never before have we had such a diverse choice of desirable electric vehicles (EVs) to buy or lease, and the same applies to the rapidly growing used market. But what are the best electric cars on the market? We've picked the top 14 must-buy EVs on sale now. 

The number of electric cars available to buy is growing every year, and more buyers than ever are moving away from fossil fuels and towards battery power. In 2022 more than 265,000 of them were sold in the UK and that looks set to be even higher in 2023. 

That number of electric cars registered is higher than in the last five years combined, which shows how rapidly the latest EVs have converted new car buyers. You'll be hard pushed to find a big car brand that doesn't have an electric car to offer, or has one coming very soon. 

With more competitive electric models on the market than ever before, now's a great time to buy. Recent spikes in the price of petrol and diesel have made a better financial case for EVs, which outsold full hybrid and plug-in hybrid cars in 2022. And even though electricity costs have risen, those able to charge at home will still save a packet over running a petrol or diesel car.  

It's easy to see why there's such a growing interest in electric cars at the moment, with the best EVs delivering excellent comfort, performance and range in a desirable package. Enough range to compete with a petrol or diesel car? We're not far off now, with some of the best electric cars capable of more than 300 miles between charges. 

There will be new electric car models being launched throughout 2024, which means the a massive amount of choice is only going to continue to grow. From cheap-to-buy small electric cars great for town to spacious and luxurious electric SUVs capable of travelling hundreds of miles between charges, there's never been more choice. Finding the best electric car which suits your needs should be a piece of cake.

Of course, one of the biggest obstacles preventing a lot of car buyers from going electric is the price. New electric cars are traditionally more expensive than a petrol or diesel model – but you can save a fortune by looking for a nearly-new model or second hand electric car. We have some of the best used electric cars available from as little as £5,000 on heycar.

Electric car charging times are also getting faster, while the charging infrastructure is improving all the time, making it easier to plan those longer trips that go beyond the range of your EV. See the latest electric car stats and projections for more info.

If you're ready to buy we've got over 4,000 Used Electric Cars for Sale, while if you want more choice, we have over 70,000 Used Cars for Sale. if you're looking to save money, check out our guide to the Best Car Deals.

New electric cars in 2024: ones to watch

There were some significant new entries into the electric car market in 2023, including the Volkswagen ID.5 and the charming ID.Buzz, as well as the Kia Niro EV, Hyundai Ioniq 6, Volvo EX30, Mercedes-Benz EQE and the Toyota bZ4X

Looking ahead to 2024 and there'll soon be the Dacia Spring, BMW iX2, Ford Explorer, Kia EV9, Peugeot e-3008, Polestar 4 (the Polestar 3 will also hit the road), plus many more electric car models due to land in showrooms soon.

With new electric cars arriving all the time, now could be the perfect time to switch to an EV. If you've still got some questions, we look at how electric cars works, advantages of electric cars and how much it costs to charge an electric car further down the page. First though, here's our guide to the best electric cars you can buy in the UK today.

Best electric cars and EVs to buy 2024

  1. Hyundai Ioniq 5
  2. Skoda Enyaq iV
  3. Kia EV6
  4. Porsche Taycan
  5. BMW i4
  6. Tesla Model 3
  7. Cupra Born
  8. MG4 EV
  9. BMW i5
  10. Volkswagen ID.Buzz
  11. Nissan Ariya
  12. Kia Niro EV
  13. Jeep Avenger
  14. Volkswagen ID.3

1. Hyundai Ioniq 5

Year launched: 2021

Hyundai Ioniq 5 Review 2023: rear dynamic
9/10

Hyundai, along with its sister brand Kia, has lead the pack when it comes to affordable electric cars with long ranges. The Kona Electric, for example, came along in 2018 with almost double the range of its electric small SUV rivals. But now it's the Ioniq 5's turn to set the standard. 

Although it's shaped like a big hatchback, the Hyundai Ioniq 5 is larger than you might expect and similar in size to the Skoda Enyaq iV. A key part of the Hyundai's appeal is its styling, with a funky blend of futuristic and retro details to make it really stand out.

While the inside isn't as dazzling on the eye as the outside, it is a very nice place to sit with a spacious, airy feel, great technology and clever features including (on Ultimate models) a sliding centre console and 'vehicle to load capability' which lets you power anything from a domestic socket via the car itself. 

If you don't want all the bells and whistles even the reasonably-priced base model offers up a WLTP range of 240 miles. But go for the 73kWh model and you'll get up to 300 miles out of a single charge, while charging is done pretty rapidly with an 80% top-up in under 20 minutes. 

On the road there might be faster and more exciting EVs, but the Ioniq 5's impressive comfort, decent performance and easy about-town driving makes it a doddle to get about in. It's one of our favourite EVs at any price. 

2. Skoda Enyaq iV

Year launched: 2021

Skoda Enyaq iV 60 moving side
9/10

The Skoda Enyaq iV could be the electric car that many of us have been waiting for. It's certainly one of the very best electric cars you can buy right now. 

Based on the same platform as Volkswagen's ID.4 and the Audi Q4 e-tron, we think it's the Enyaq that's the best choice out of the three cars. Why's that you ask? Surely Volkswagen and Audi trumps Skoda? Don't get us wrong, the Volkswagen ID.4 and Audi Q4 e-tron are very good electric cars, it's just that the Enyaq offers greater practicality, more generous kit levels and a more affordable price tag.

Skoda's second all-electric car (after the small but very capable Citigo-e iV), the Enyaq is a family-focused electric SUV and that means it's big on space. There's a large and comfy cabin with a large 13-inch media displaying dominating the dash, while there's plenty of stowage space and a big boot to, eh, boot. 

The Skoda Enyaq is available with either a 62kWh battery that delivers a range of up to 256 miles (badged the Enyaq iV 60), and one with a larger 82kWh battery that produces a range of up to 333 miles (this time badged the Enyaq iV 80). Expect charge times to take around an hour with a 50kW rapid charger, while the Enyaq can be specified with an optional 125kW rapid charging capability that adds 80% of range in 38 minutes.

It's just as good to drive as its more expensive siblings, but roomier and more practical. And yet, the interior still feels well made and is well equipped. Skoda really knocked one out the park with the Enyaq. 

3. Kia EV6

Year launched: 2021

Kia EV6 Review 2023: front-three quarter
9/10

Think the idea of a Kia - and an electric one at that - is mind-numbingly dull? The EV6 should make you think again. 

It's best to consider Kia EV6 as the Niro EV's cooler, sportier uncle, and putting the two side-by-side hammers that analogy home. Its striking exterior combines with a modern-looking, well-executed interior that offers both dazzling new tech and a number of neat practicality features. It's even pretty roomy.

But what makes the Kia such an accomplished all-rounder for its relatively modest outlay is also the driving experience. With punchy electric motors, agile handling and a grown-up (if slightly firm) ride, the EV6 makes almost everything else on the market feel a bit soulless.

There's a dual motor version that does 0-62mph in 5.2 seconds, and a super-fast GT version on the way that'll bait a Tesla Model 3. But, really, the single motor version is plenty powerful enough for most people's needs.  That's also the version with the longest range, offering up to 328 miles on a charge. What's more, it can even power household devices or even charge up other EVs from outside the car, which is a very clever feature.

4. Porsche Taycan

Year launched: 2019

Porsche Taycan Review 2023 Front View
9/10

If there's anything that signifies how seriously the car world is about the shift to EVs, it's the arrival of an electric Porsche. Sure, some people will hate the mere idea of the Taycan, but it's truly one of the best electric cars you can buy today.

For a start, it's properly quick. The Turbo S packs a whopping 761PS (with overboost function), resulting in 0-62mph acceleration of just 2.8 seconds. Not only is it one of the fastest electric cars going, but it's faster than a lot of supercars, while top speed is 162mph. Lesser models aren't quite so impressive on paper, but all Taycans combine impeccable handling with impressive long-distance comfort.

Indeed, it's long-distance touring that the Taycan perhaps does best. It can cover up to 301 miles on a charge, while there's a surprising amount of room inside – with enough space for adults in the back and a big boot. There's even an estate-like Cross Turismo model available, providing a sportier alternative to electric SUVs like the Audi e-tron.

5. BMW i4

Year launched: 2021

BMW i4
9/10

If you're shopping for a compact executive car, you'd have to be a die-hard German car hater to not at least consider a BMW 3 Series. BMW wants this to also become the case with the all-electric i4, which is easily the brand's most accomplished EV to date. 

The BMW i4 is effectively a rival to the Tesla Model 3 and Polestar 2. But unlike those cars it doesn't shout about being electric - in fact you'd be hard pressed at a glance to tell it apart from a regular 4 Series Gran Coupe. And that's key to the i4's appeal: by not trying too hard it's basically taking what we know and love about BMWs with engines, and applying it to an EV.

That means the interior is familiar but brilliant, with excellent quality and one of the best infotainment systems on the market. It also means it's fantastic to drive, with a real sense of sharpness and balance to the handling. 

The headline model in the i4 range is the M50, with its punchy 544PS and dual electric motors. While that'll give a Model 3 Performance a run for its money, in the real world the 340PS eDrive40 model is plenty quick enough, and that's the version with a Tesla-matching 367-mile range from its 83.9kWh battery. 

6. Tesla Model 3

Year launched: 2018

Tesla Model 3 Review 2023 Overhead View
9/10

Even the most hardened of Tesla haters can't deny the sheer objective excellence of the Model 3. And buyers haven't either, because the Tesla Model 3 is one of the most popular electric cars in the world right now, even a few years on from its launch.

Why? Well it's one of the longest range electric cars money can buy, yet despite new prices increasing of late it's still relatively affordable. The Tesla Model 3 Long Range can officially manage up to 374 miles on a charge, but even when that does run out you don't need to worry too much because Tesla's brilliant Supercharger network will always have your back. 

The Model 3 might not be the most inspiring thing to look at inside or out, but the technology on offer via that giant central touchscreen makes VW's efforts look half-baked.  You'll need to get used to everything (we mean everything) being controlled through that screen, however, and there are better quality interiors around. But the Tesla is spacious and well-equipped. 

We can't complain about the way the Model 3 drives, with a sorted ride and composed handling. Even the basic ones are very fast, but the Tesla Model 3 Performance is astonishingly rapid, going from 0-62mph in 3.1 seconds. Want to bait supercars without the local pollution? This is the car. 

7. Cupra Born

Year launched: 2022

Cupra Born Review 2024: Driving dynamic
9/10

On the face of it, the Cupra Born is simply a rehashed Volkswagen ID.3 with an angry face. But it's so much more than that. It's almost an electric hot hatch (almost...) with suspension that's been tuned to make the Cupra Born genuinely fun to drive. If ever there was an EV that could attract the attention of die-hard petrolheads, this is it.

You get similar powertrains offerings to the Volkswagen ID.3, including a punchy 'e-Boost' model with 230PS providing acceleration that could almost keep a Tesla Model 3 on its toes. We reckon the regular 204PS model is more than sufficient, though, while buyers get a choice of two battery packs: 58kWh or 77kWh. The latter provides a range of up to 340 miles.

It's inside the Cupra Born where you'll notice the biggest difference from the Volkswagen ID.3. OK, its cabin isn't without its irritations (why do you have to stroke the volume control on the steering wheel?), but it looks and feels classier than the VW. It's comfortable and spacious, too, with more room for passengers than the Cupra Leon hot hatch.

8. MG4 EV

Year launched: 2022

MG4 EV Review 2024: front three quarter dynamic
9/10

Who'd have thought it'd be MG that cornered the market for cheap electric cars? It's a brand that's better associated with British sports cars, hot hatches and - in recent years - below-par Chinese-built hatchbacks. But the MG4 EV is one of the best electric hatchbacks on sale - and that's before you factor in the sub-£30k price tag.

For the price of a Renault Zoe, you get a Golf-sized family car with a decent range (up to 281 miles) and seven-year warranty, not to mention a long list of standard equipment. Even the top-spec MG4 EV Trophy is significantly cheaper than the Volkswagen ID.3 (its main rival) and comes with a genuinely impressive kit list, including a 360-degree camera, built-in navigation, heated front seats and a heated steering wheel.

What really makes the MG4 EV stand out against other MG models (including the MG5 and MG ZS EV) is its clever packaging. It's been designed from the scratch as an EV, without the need to accommodate a big petrol engine. That means it's a lot more spacious inside than many cars of this size. And as the electric motor drives the rear wheels, it's also a lot of fun to drive - good news for traditional MG buyers who have fond memories of cars like the MG B.

9. BMW i5

Year launched: 2023

BMW i5 Review 2023
9/10

It’s taken a little while for BMW to catch-up to some of its competitors in the EV market, but it now has a solid range of fully electric vehicles and the i5 is a great example of a supremely comfortable saloon cruiser.

This all-electric 5 Series follows the brief of its combustion-powered predecessors, it’s good in almost every area with a refined driving experience and a fantastic look and feel. It stares the Porsche Taycan square in the face and laughs, with greater range and more space for passengers and luggage while delivering a similarly excellent drive. 

Talking of range, the i5 can do up to 354 miles on a single charge, although real world usage will likely bring that figure closer to 300. Still, that’s a decent slug which will get you across a fair proportion of the country before you need to start considering a charging stop. For those who want to really kick things up a notch, there’s a M60 variant which will do 0-62mph in just 3.8 seconds, although max range drops to 315 miles.

The BMW i5 may be a little 'safer' when it compares to some of the other vehicles in our best electric cars rundown, but it delivers a familiar BMW 5 series experience which means you're in good hands.

10. Volkswagen ID.Buzz

Year launched: 2022

Volkswagen ID.Buzz Review 2023: front driving
8/10

Volkswagen has a growing range of competent and long-range electric cars, but there's nothing that really tugs at the heartstrings. Until now, that is, with the charming VW ID.Buzz.

Taking clear inspiration from a decades-old icon, the Type 2 Bus, the Volkswagen ID.Buzz MPV brings the same mix of practicality and style into the 21st century. And like the old bus the engine (or rather electric motor) sits at the back, leaving a bluff front end and wheel-at-each-corner design to maximise space. 

And there's plenty of that inside, With a vast front cabin and (optionally) electric sliding doors that reveal generous rear seat space for three. It's a shame you don't get individual rear seats, but even more of a pity that we'll have to wait at least a year for a seven-seat version. Despite that, though, we love the airy and smart cabin with its bright finishes and premium feel. 

Another thing thats notably un van-like is the driving experience. In fact, it drives like a very well-sorted electric car, with SUV-like handling but an even smoother ride than other VW electric cars. It's really quiet, too, and while performance isn't electrifying right now there will be faster models in time. 

11. Nissan Ariya

Year launched: 2022

Nissan Ariya Review 2023: front side
8/10

Nissan knows how to make a good electric car. The original Nissan Leaf was one of the very first mass-market EVs, launched way back in 2011 during a time when diesel was still considered the eco fuel of choice for many.

The market's moved on a lot since then, though. Car manufacturers desperately need an electric SUV in their line-up to be considered relevant – enter the Nissan Ariya. Set to compete with the likes of the Volkswagen ID.4, Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Ford Mustang Mach-e, the Nissan Ariya combines the brand's expertise with the Nissan Leaf EV and hugely popular Nissan Qashqai family SUV.

And the result is impressive. While its modern exterior knocks the Nissan Leaf out of the park, the interior is truly revolutionary. Spacious, of course, while also finished in the highest quality materials. You get an impressive new dual-screen infotainment system, too. Combine the ultra-modern interior with a 329-mile range and we reckon the new Nissan Ariya is one of the best electric SUVs you can buy.

12. Kia Niro EV

Year launched: 2022

Kia Niro EV Review 2023: front driving
8/10

The old Kia e-Niro was one of the best all-round electric cars but, while it charmed buyers with its versatility and low running costs, it couldn't be accused of having much in the way of style.

That's all changed with the new Kia Niro EV (note the name change). While the new model doesn't build on its predecessor a great deal in terms of facts and figures (its official range figure is up just three miles to 285), it does have a huge amount more charisma. And technology. And all the kind of things you want in an electric car.

That's because, since the old e-Niro was launched, Kia's invested a lot of time into developing its flagship electric car, the EV6. And a lot of that investment is now dripping down into the new Kia Niro EV. It might be a more affordable option, but its interior is almost as plush as the cabin in the EV6 (even with sustainable materials such as vegan leather seats). The passenger's seat can be fully reclined (ideal for taking a kip while charging), while the Niro EV supports vehicle-to-grid charging – so you can use its high-voltage battery to power a kettle or even charge other electric vehicles.

13. Jeep Avenger

Year launched: 2023

Jeep Avenger Review 2024: driving dynamic
8/10

The Avenger is Jeep’s first electric car, and the pint-sized crossover SUV does well to offer charm, comfort and even some rugged performance without the aid of internal combustion. This isn't an EV made for true off-roading though, with its diminutive frame best suited to city streets and occasionally stretching its legs on the motorway.

With a touted range of up to 244 miles, you’ll get enough distance from a single charge for the vast majority of your journeys - especially if this isn’t a car with an eye on long-range mileage. Plus with 100W charging you can replenish the battery (20%-80%) in as little as 24 minutes. 

The small frame means while the Avenger is comfortable, it’s also compact - there’s not a huge amount of boot space and the back seats are best reserved for kids. What does impress is the nippy driving style, with enough poke to keep you engaged around town, and if you do find yourself on less familiar surfaces the Avenger comes with a suite of all-terrain modes and a hill descent system.

There’s a decent amount of kit in the entry-level Longitude, but the mid-tier Altitude trim gets you 17-inch alloys, adaptive cruise control, a reversing camera and a few other useful goodies.

14. Volkswagen ID.3

Year launched: 2020

Volkswagen ID.3 Review 2023: static
7/10

The Volkswagen ID.3 feels a bit like a Golf, only with electric power – and that makes it the perfect introduction to the world of EVs and one of the best electric cars available today. It might not be as quick as a Tesla Model 3 or as stylish as a Volvo XC40 Recharge, but the ID.3 has a practical cabin and is very easy to drive. 

There are a range of different battery sizes and power outputs to choose from, allowing you to pick the right combination that suits you. The most affordable models combine a 58kWh battery with a 145PS power output, resulting in a range of up to 263 miles. If you plan to travel even further without stopping, the top-spec ID.3 Tour, with its 77kWh battery, is capable of covering an impressive 336 miles.

One of the Volkswagen ID.3's quirks is that the motor's positioned in the rear, like an old VW Beetle. It drives the rear wheels, helping the ID.3's agility both in and out of town. It also contributes to a more spacious cabin - while the footprint of the ID.3 isn't much bigger than the old Volkswagen e-Golf, it feels much less cramped inside.

It's not just the actual space; the ID 3 is a very light and airy car to sit in. Combine that with an easy, enjoyable driving experience and it's pretty much as good an all-rounder as the Golf is, just in electric form.

Audi e-tron on charge

How do electric cars work?

In many ways, driving an electric car is exactly the same as driving a petrol or diesel car. You still get a steering wheel, pedals and a gear shifter. 

Rather than a petrol or diesel engine sending power to the wheels, batteries send power to electric motors that drive the wheels. It's a relatively simple system that requires very few moving parts - just one or two motors fed by what is usually a rather large battery. 

Probably the first thing that sticks out is how quiet electric cars are. An electric car's motor doesn’t roar into life like a petrol or diesel engine when you turn it on – there’s no noise. Instead, you usually get a light on the dash saying ‘Ready’ or words to that effect which might be accompanied by a warning tone when it switches on.

That lack of noise continues as you get underway. Electric cars are so quiet that an EU rule brought in in 2019 means they have to be fitted with an external noise-emitting device to warn pedestrians they’re approaching. Many EVs also emit a soundtrack internally for those who miss the aurul experience of a combustion engine car, but it can be turned off. 

Aside from the lack of noise, the best electric cars are notable for how easy they are to drive. Electric cars produce maximum torque immediately so you get instant acceleration the minute you push your foot on the accelerator. 

BMW i4 Review 2024: front dynamic

This low-down urge means that electric cars can get away with having only one gear, although some have more – the Porsche Taycan has a two-speed gearbox – so they drive like an automatic car. The linear way an EV accelerates is comparable to the feeling you get when an electric train builds speed. 

Regenerative brakes on an electric car are another feature you’ll need to get used to. Regenerative brakes help recharge an electric car as it slows to a stop, which is one of the reasons EVs are more efficient in town – where you do lots of stop-start driving – than on the motorway.

Regenerative brakes also mean you can drive most electric cars using the accelerator pedal alone, the minute you take your foot off the pedal the car starts slowing. Often you can adjust the severity, so it loses speed gradually or with a force comparable to pressing the brakes. In theory, sudden stops are the only time you'll need to use the actual brakes.

Kia EV6 Review 2023: front-three quarter

Benefits and advantages of driving electric cars

The primary benefit of driving an electric car is that it produces no exhaust emissions, so it makes cities a nicer place to live and a safer place to breath. Some of the UK’s biggest cities have failed to meet EU targets on the harmful NO2 emissions produced by diesel vehicles and electric cars represent a big step towards achieving these targets.

With many cities introducing Clean Air Zones, with those driving into these areas required to pay a fee, a big advantage of owning an electric car in one of these areas is that you'll be exempt from these charges. 

Of course, nobody can claim that electric cars are truly green: how eco-friendly they are depends entirely on the mix of renewable sources in your electricity grid. But, generally speaking, they are better for the environment in their use than burning pure fossil fuels in an engine. 

Another benefit of an electric car is that you'll often find dedicated parking bays for EVs with free parking, while some councils offer free annual parking permits for electric car owners. 

Aside from being cheaper to run, cleaner and exempt from paying emissions tariffs, as well as road tax – electric cars should be a lot more reliable than a conventional petrol or diesel. 

That’s because they have far fewer moving parts – in a nutshell, there’s a lot less to go wrong. Even their batteries, which do degrade over time, have been found to keep at least 70% of their capacity after 10 years. 

Polestar 2 Review 2024: infotainment screen

Disadvantages of driving an electric car

Price and  range are probably the two biggest stumbling blocks you need to clear before you decide to buy an electric car.

Government legislation has changed recently (and not for the better) and is now offering a £1500 grant on electric cars under £32,000 to tempt buyers. However, the reduction in the grant amount (it was £2500) and the cap on the price that you can use the grant on does limit the amount of electric cars you can apply this reduction to. The popular Volkswagen ID.3 starts at £32,200 for example, which is some £7700 more than an entry-level Volkswagen Golf

To offset this differential, manufacturers tend to load their electric cars with lots of equipment. 

Nevertheless, they still can’t compete with the range you’ll get out of a petrol or diesel car. Even a performance model like the Golf GTI should get a range of more than 400 miles from its 50-litre petrol tank –  better than the 336 miles you’ll get out of a top-of-the-range ID.3.

It's also worth considering your charging situation. If you can easily charge your car at home, via a wallbox or a three-pin socket, then your EV will be much cheaper to run than a petrol or diesel car. But if you have to rely solely on public charging, that can often prove quite expensive, eating away at your fuel savings. 

Types of electric car

Both self-charging and plug-in hybrid cars feature batteries, they also use a petrol or diesel engine as well. Check out our guide to the best hybrid cars to find out more. 

When we talk about electric cars, we're referring to those powered purely by battery power. These electric cars are also referred to as electric vehicles (EVs) or battery electric vehicles (BEVs), but are the same thing as an electric car.

Best Electric Car FAQs

Andy Brady

Written by

Andy Brady

There are lots of excellent electric cars on the UK market and the best electric car depends on your requirements and budget. Overall though, we reckon the Hyundai Ioniq 5 is the best electric car you can buy right now. With its futuristic looks, brilliant EV range and space for the whole family, it also comes with a excellent 5 year warranty. 

If you're looking for the cheapest electric car, there's a growing number of options available. If you're looking for a little car to drive around town, we'd recommend the popular Renault Zoe or the stylish Peugeot e-208. If you're looking for an affordable electric family car then the MG ZS EV is a great buy. 

One of the biggest obstacles most people cite when it comes to buying an electric car is the price. You can save money by searching for a used electric car on heycar. All cars advertised on heycar are less than eight years old, with less than 100,000 miles on the clock and come with a 12 month warranty – so you can feel relaxed about buying a used EV.

The UK Government has said that sales of new conventional petrol and diesel cars must end by 2035, and not 2030 as originally planned. Hybrid models capable of travelling a 'significant' distance under electric power can be sold until 2035. Once these dates have passed, you'll still be able to buy and sell used petrol and diesel models as well as drive them on the road.

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Deposit con. £500
£510mo PCP
FY42RP

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £509.82, Customer Deposit: £5,252.00, Total Deposit: £5,752.70, Lender Deposit Contribution: £500.00, Optional Final Payment: £18,223.00, Total Charge For Credit: £6,801.40, Total Amount Payable: £41,819.40, Representative APR: 9.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 9.47%, Excess Mileage Charge: 9.6ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

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Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £432.43, Customer Deposit: £4,644.00, Total Deposit: £5,144.00, Lender Deposit Contribution: £500.00, Optional Final Payment: £16,775.00, Total Charge For Credit: £6,094.05, Total Amount Payable: £37,054.05, Representative APR: 9.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 9.46%, Excess Mileage Charge: 9.6ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000